Abebe Bikila 1960, 64& Feyisa Lilesa 2016

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Tuesday, April 30, 2013

3 Ways To Add Speed Into Aerobic Training - Competitor.com



  • By Jeff Gaudette
  • Published 15 hours ago
Try some hill sprints to break up the monotony of aerobic training. Photo:www.shutterstock.com

Aerobic training is boring, so use these tips to get some speed into your workouts.
Aerobic development is the primary avenue to long-term success in distance running. This reality has been proven through researchand confirmed time and again by elite athletes and the best distances coaches in the world, even as early as the 1960s.
Why is developing your aerobic system so important to running performance?
Most importantly, for races 5K and longer, 90 percent or more of the energy required comes from the aerobic system. However, aerobic training also elicits some critical physiological adaptations.
First, aerobic training sparks your body to create more capillaries, which are the small blood vessels that surround muscle fibers and help deliver oxygen and nutrients to the muscle tissues. Second, aerobic training creates more and denser mitochondria, which break down nutrients into usable energy. Third, the number of myoglobin in the muscle fibers is increased, which help release oxygen to the mitochondria.
Simply speaking, aerobic development allows you to more efficiently deliver oxygen and energy to your muscles, thus allowing you to run significantly faster.
Unfortunately, developing your aerobic system isn’t exactly exciting. Aerobic training consists mainly of slow, easy running at around 65 percent of 5k pace, or about 65 to 70 percent of your maximum heart rate. To mix it up, you can add a few steady state runs, performed just as your aerobic threshold, but that’s about it. Moreover, even though aerobic training is critical to long-term development, running nothing but slow, easy miles means you ignore other systems, like your speed.
So, how can you stay focused on aerobic development while staying motivated about training and maintain your speed and turnover? Sneak it into your training! In this article, I’ll show you some sneaky ways you can add speed to your plan while still keeping your training focused on the long-term.

Tempo Intervals

Tempo runs are a common workout for most runners. They are a great way to improve your ability to reconvert lactate into usable energy. However, because typical tempo run paces take you right to the edge of your lactate threshold, they are typically too fast to be in your aerobic development zone and less experienced runners can only maintain tempo pace for a few miles.
To solve this problem, you can break your tempo run up into shorter intervals with a very short, jogging rest between them. The rest, while short, allows you to run faster without reaching your lactate threshold and it enables you to run a greater volume since you won’t be as stressed.
Some of my favorite tempo interval workouts are 6 x 1 mile at 10 mile to half-marathon pace with a short 45-60 second jog; or 3 x 2 miles at half-marathon pace with a short 90 second to 2 minute jog between reps.
These can be a great way to keep a workout more aerobic focused while still running faster paces and adding variety to your workouts.

Jogging Rest During Speed Workouts

Another helpful way to sneak speed into your training without sacrificing aerobic development is to tightly control the pace and duration of your rest intervals. By jogging at a moderate pace during your rest intervals, you can maintain a mostly high-end aerobic effort while still running paces near 5k or even 3k race pace.
A couple of my favorite workouts are: 12 x 400 meters at 3K pace with 90 seconds jogging rest at 90 seconds slower than marathon pace; or 8 x 800 meters at 5K pace with 2 minutes jogging rest at 90 seconds slower than marathon pace.
It’s important during these workouts not to push the fast portion of the workout too hard. The focus should be on aerobic training with the secondary benefit being turning the legs over. Just because you can run the 400-meter portion of the workout faster doesn’t mean you should.
These types of workouts allow you to turnover your legs, but because you’re keeping the rest both active and at a solid aerobic pace, you can maintain a largely aerobic focus for the workout.

Strides and Hill Sprints

Finally, traditional strides and explosive hill sprints are an effective way to develop and maintain your fast twitch muscle fibers and speed while still keeping your training focus on aerobic development.
After your easy runs, you can include a series of four to six 20-second strides performed roughly at 1-mile race pace. Take a full recovery between each stride. Strides help with improving your running form and neuromuscular recruitment, which can lead to improvements in efficiency as well.
Another tactic is to perform eight to ten 10- to 12-second explosive hill sprints. Choose a hill with a 7 to 8 percent grade; stand at the bottom and, from a standing start, sprint up as fast as you can and visualize yourself exploding up the hill. Walk slowly and gently back down the hill, rest until you are completely recovered, and begin the next repeat.
It is very important when implementing strides and hill sprints to take a full recovery between each sprint. Most runners will need at least two to three minutes. Shortening this recovery time and trying to get “more of a workout” defeats the purpose and reduces the benefits of the session.
Adding these short bursts of speed improves muscle power, efficiency and neuromuscular coordination. However, because they are short, mostly alactic in nature, and utilize a full recovery, they won’t make you tired for your next run.
If you find developing your aerobic system to be too boring to maintain for long training segments, consider sneaking some speed into your training and get the benefits of aerobic development with the joys of running fast.
FILED UNDER: TrainingTAGS:  /  /  /  / 
Jeff Gaudette

Jeff Gaudette

Jeff has been running for 13 years, at all levels of the sport. He was a two time Division-I All-American in Cross Country while at Brown University and competed professionally for 4 years after college for the Hansons-Brooks Distance Project. Jeff's writing has been featured in Running Times magazine, Endurance Magazine, as well as numerous local magazine fitness columns.

Sunday, April 28, 2013

Ethiopian breaks course record at Metro Group Marathon Duesseldorf

Metro Group Marathon Duesseldorf - Ethiopian runners wonthe men's and women's titles at Sunday's METRO GROUP Marathon Duesseldorf in Germany.

According to the online RaceNewsService, 26 year-old Dereje Debele Tulu, who won the men's event, broke the course record with two hours, seven minutes and 48 seconds. It was the first sub 2:08 time in Duesseldorf.

Second placed Pius Ondoro of Kenya clocked 2:08:17 while compatriot Duncan Koech was third with 2:09:10.

In the women's class, the big pre-race favourite, Melkam Gizaw, was the winner with a personal best of 2:26:24.

It was the second fastest women’s performance in the history of the race.

Kenyan debutant Rebecca Chesire ran a fine 2:27:52 for second place, while Agnieszka Ciolek-Mierzejewska (Poland) was third with 2:33:36.

Adding all events, 14,000 runners entered the METRO GROUP Marathon Duesseldorf, with around 4,250 of them marathon runners.

The race is an IAAF Bronze Label Race.

Pana 28/04/2

Thursday, April 18, 2013

Ethiopian "Miracle Man" Sets World Record: 'Longest Distance Travelled in One Minute while Balanced on Crutches'

Tameru Zegeye—an Ethiopian athlete who grew up in the mountainous region of Welo—has attempted to set the World Recordfor the 'Longest Distance Travelled while balanced on Crutches' (Hands).

On April 14th, 2013 a crowd of nearly 20 friends and family gathered to witness Tameru cover 76 meters using just his hands and crutches down the track of the National Stadium in downtown Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
Ethiopia has a deep tradition for running and to pay homage to the country's athletes, Tameru's World Record was witnessed by Mohammed Aman—Olympic run ner and 800mDiamond League Champion—who acted as the World Record's adjudicator.
Other judges included Keith Bowers (Timekeeper) of the BBC, Natalie Miller VP of Africa for Operation Smile (NGO for people with disabilities), and Hannah Gibson, Country Director for Jhpiego (International NGO in maternal and child health).

The crowd cheered and Tameru's heart grew as he took one step further towards his dream of being recognized as the World Record Holder for his self-styled sport ofbalancing on crutches on his hands.
The initiative started last year when Tameru was 'discovered' by the media and talent agency #thisisGuavo. Since then, a small film crew, friends & more than a dozen contributors have all encouraged Tameru to continue following his dreams of becoming a recognized athlete despite his disabilities.

Tameru was born disabled and could not walk for the first 15 years of his life. After surgery, he felt empowered to start and finish high school, learn English and graduate from college with a degree in Tourism. Today, Tameru's spirit has guided him to the world of disabled sports, and by setting this prestigious, new World Record, he believes he will be able to help and inspire other disabled athletes to realize their abilities and self worth. To read more about Tameru's life story, go to:
http://nicojah.com/i-am-evolution

Tameru would like to recognize the participating bodies for their assistance and help to set this World Record: The Debre Birhan Circus, Ethiopian Football Federation & #thisisGuavo media firm. Tameru and his team are currently preparing the video, photography and witness statements to have his new World Record recognized by Guiness World Records and other governing bodies.

___________________

Addis Ababa

Cel: +251 920 723 065

*www.nicojah.com*

Monday, April 15, 2013

Boston Marathon bombs kill 2, hurt 49 – This Just In - CNN.com Blogs

April 15th, 2013
05:09 PM ET

Officials: Boston Marathon bombs kill 2, hurt 49





  • Two dead in bomb blasts near finish line of Boston Marathon, Boston police say. Area hospitals say 49 injured.







  • Two explosions happened at about 2:50 p.m., more than two hours after the first of the race's nearly 27,000 runners had crossed the finish line.







  • Third blast later reported at JFK Library about 5 miles away, police say. Not clear whether that blast is connected to first two.







  • Race called off; Red Cross website established to help people find loved ones in the area







  • Check back here for updates; full story here; also, see CNN affiliates WBZ;WCVBWHDH




  • [Update, 5:09 p.m. ET] It will take a long time to clear the area, because lots of people dropped bags and whatever else they had when the finish-line blasts happened. Authorities have to check all of those bags, and bomb squads "may be blowing things up over the next few hours" out of precaution, Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said.
    Thousands of runners still had yet to finish the race when the bombs exploded in a spectator area along Boylston Street near the finish line, CNN executive producer Matt Frucci at the scene.
    [Update, 4:58 p.m. ET] New details from Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis:
     A third explosion happened at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library "about a half-hour ago." The library is about 5 miles southeast of the Boston Marathon finish line.
     Police don't immediately know whether that explosion is related to the two near the Boston Marathon finish line.
     The two blasts near the finish line  along Boylston Street near Copley Square - "happened 50 to 100 yards apart."
     "We're recommending to people that they stay home ... and that they don'r go anyplace and congregate in large crowds."
     Relatives of people who may be missing in the area can call the mayor's hotline at 617-635-4500.
     Anyone who has information about the bombings or saw anything suspicious can call 1-800-494-TIPS.

    [Update, 4:46 p.m. ET] Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick says “this is a horrific day in Boston."
    "My thoughts and prayers are with those who have been injured," Patrick said in a statement released this afternoon. "I have been in touch with the president, Mayor Menino and our public safety leaders. Our focus is on making sure that the area around Copley Square is safe and secured. I am asking everyone to stay away from Copley Square and let the first responders do their jobs.”
    [Update, 4:45 p.m. ET] It appears that so many people are using cell phones in the center of Boston, consistent service is hard to get  and the overload is hampering the investigation, two federal law enforcement sources tell CNN.

    A person who was injured in an explosion near the finish line of the Boston Marathon is taken away from the scene.
    [Update, 4:40 p.m. ET] Another journalist says she saw victims who lost limbs. This account is from Boston Globe political reporter Cynthia Needham:

    Boston Marathon bombs kill 2, hurt 49 – This Just In - CNN.com Blogs

    April 15th, 2013
    05:09 PM ET

    Officials: Boston Marathon bombs kill 2, hurt 49





  • Two dead in bomb blasts near finish line of Boston Marathon, Boston police say. Area hospitals say 49 injured.







  • Two explosions happened at about 2:50 p.m., more than two hours after the first of the race's nearly 27,000 runners had crossed the finish line.







  • Third blast later reported at JFK Library about 5 miles away, police say. Not clear whether that blast is connected to first two.







  • Race called off; Red Cross website established to help people find loved ones in the area







  • Check back here for updates; full story here; also, see CNN affiliates WBZ;WCVBWHDH




  • [Update, 5:09 p.m. ET] It will take a long time to clear the area, because lots of people dropped bags and whatever else they had when the finish-line blasts happened. Authorities have to check all of those bags, and bomb squads "may be blowing things up over the next few hours" out of precaution, Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis said.
    Thousands of runners still had yet to finish the race when the bombs exploded in a spectator area along Boylston Street near the finish line, CNN executive producer Matt Frucci at the scene.
    [Update, 4:58 p.m. ET] New details from Boston Police Commissioner Ed Davis:
     A third explosion happened at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library "about a half-hour ago." The library is about 5 miles southeast of the Boston Marathon finish line.
     Police don't immediately know whether that explosion is related to the two near the Boston Marathon finish line.
     The two blasts near the finish line  along Boylston Street near Copley Square - "happened 50 to 100 yards apart."
     "We're recommending to people that they stay home ... and that they don'r go anyplace and congregate in large crowds."
     Relatives of people who may be missing in the area can call the mayor's hotline at 617-635-4500.
     Anyone who has information about the bombings or saw anything suspicious can call 1-800-494-TIPS.

    [Update, 4:46 p.m. ET] Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick says “this is a horrific day in Boston."
    "My thoughts and prayers are with those who have been injured," Patrick said in a statement released this afternoon. "I have been in touch with the president, Mayor Menino and our public safety leaders. Our focus is on making sure that the area around Copley Square is safe and secured. I am asking everyone to stay away from Copley Square and let the first responders do their jobs.”
    [Update, 4:45 p.m. ET] It appears that so many people are using cell phones in the center of Boston, consistent service is hard to get  and the overload is hampering the investigation, two federal law enforcement sources tell CNN.

    A person who was injured in an explosion near the finish line of the Boston Marathon is taken away from the scene.
    [Update, 4:40 p.m. ET] Another journalist says she saw victims who lost limbs. This account is from Boston Globe political reporter Cynthia Needham:

    Ethiopian, Kenyan winners in 2013 Boston Marathon

    ap-lelisa-desisa-boston-marathon-finish-line
    BOSTON (AP) - Lelisa Desisa of Ethiopia took the title in the 117th edition of the Boston Marathon on Monday, winning a three-way sprint down Boylston Street to finish in 2 hours, 10 minutes, 22 seconds.

    In just his second race at the 26.2-mile distance, Desisa finished 5 seconds ahead of Kenya's Micah Kogo to earn $150,000 and the traditional olive wreath. Gebregziabher Gebremariam of Ethiopia was another second behind him, in third place, with American Jason Hartmann matching his 2012 finish by coming in fourth.

    Rita Jeptoo won the women's race earlier for her second Boston victory. Jeptoo, who also won in 2006, finished in 2:26:25 for her first win in a major race since taking two years off after having a baby.

    After a series of close finishes in the women's race -- five consecutive years with 3 or fewer seconds separating the top two -- Jeptoo had a relatively comfortable 33-second lead over Meseret Hailu of Ethiopia, with defending champion Sharon Cherop of Kenya another 3 seconds back. American Shalane Flanagan, of nearby Marblehead, was fourth in the women's division.

    This year it was the men's race with the sprint to the finish.

    Desisa was among a group of nine men -- all from Kenya or Ethiopia -- who broke away from the pack in the first half of the race. There were three remaining when they came out of Kenmore Square with a mile to go.

    But Desisa quickly pulled away and widened his distance in the sprint to the tape.

    He is the fourth Ethiopian to win the men's race and the 24th East African to win in the past 26 years. Jeptoo is the third straight Kenyan woman to win and the 15th East African winner in the last 17 years on the women's side.

    Lisa Larsen-Weidenbach, who won in 1985, is the last American champion; 1983 winner Greg Meyer was the last American man to break the tape.

    A year after heat approaching 90 degrees sent record numbers of participants in search of medical help, temperatures in the high 40s greeted the field of 24,662 at the start in Hopkinton. It climbed to 54 degrees by the time the winners reached Copley Square in Boston.

    Japan's Hiroyuki Yamamoto was the first winner of the day, cruising to victory in the men's wheelchair race by 39 seconds over nine-time champion Ernst Van Dyk of South Africa. Tatyana McFadden, a Russian orphan who attends the University of Illinois, won the women's race.

    Race day got started with 26 seconds of silence in honor of the victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. A little more than 2 hours later, the lead runners will go past the Mile 26 marker, which has been decorated with the Newtown, Conn., seal and dedicated to the memory of those killed there.

    The 53 wheelchair competitors left Hopkinton at 9:17 a.m., followed 15 minutes later by the 51 elite women. The men were under way at 10 a.m., followed by three waves that over the next 40 minutes would send the entire field of 27,000 on its way to Copley Square.

    Last year's race came under the hottest sustained temperatures on record. About 2,300 runners took organizers up on the offer to sit that one out and run this year instead.

    About Me

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    Prof. Muse Tegegne has lectured sociology Change &  Liberation  in Europe, Africa and Americas. He has obtained  Doctorat es Science from the University of Geneva.   A PhD in Developmental Studies & ND in Natural Therapies.  He wrote on the  problematic of  the Horn of  Africa extensively. He Speaks Amharic, Tigergna, Hebrew, English, French. He has a good comprehension of Arabic, Spanish and Italian.